Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Walgreen Co. are working together to provide free access to certain fertility medications and educational resources.


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Ferring, Walgreens help cancer patients access fertility drugs

September 7th, 2012

PARSIPPANY, N.J. – Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Walgreen Co. are working together to provide free access to certain fertility medications and educational resources.

Ferring said Thursday that the collaboration, in recognition of National Ovarian Cancer Month and Gynecologic Cancer Month in September, is being done as part of the pharmaceutical company's h.e.a.r.t. BEAT program.

Funded by Ferring and provided as a public service, the program is a patient assistance initiative for eligible women of reproductive age who have received a new cancer diagnosis and want to undergo fertility preservation before starting their cancer treatment.

H.e.a.r.t. BEAT will provide certain fertility medications to eligible patients enrolled in the program as well as educational resources through Walgreens Specialty Pharmacy. Those resources include access to highly specialized nurses, informational guides detailing how cancer treatment affects fertility, multimedia materials outlining potential fertility options patients that may wish to discuss with their physician, and specialized modules to teach injection training.

According to Ferring, the h.e.a.r.t. BEAT program is designed to provide quick access to fertility preservation to ensure that patients don't lose valuable time in starting necessary cancer treatments. The company reported that even though over 75% of women age 35 or younger who are childless at cancer diagnosis want to have children, many don't recall ever having a discussion on the potential impact that their cancer treatment may have on their future fertility. Of patients who receive information on their fertility preservation options, many cite financial reasons for electing not to undergo treatment.

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