Grants from the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation made possible 65 health fairs that served 3,500 patients as part of Million Hearts, a public-private partnership to help prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years.


NACDS Foundation, Million Hearts, health fairs, heart attacks, strokes, heart health, pharmacists, pharmacy students, Steve Anderson, Kathleen Jaeger, Janet Wright, National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation, aspirin therapy, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, smoking cessation
































































































































































































































INSIDE THIS ISSUE
News
Opinion
Other Services
Reprints / E-Prints
Submit News
White Papers

Retail News Breaks Archives

NACDS Foundation helps promote heart health

November 6th, 2012

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Grants from the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation made possible 65 health fairs that served 3,500 patients as part of Million Hearts, a public-private partnership to help prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years.

The NACDS Foundation said Monday that it provided $35,000 in grants to 15 schools and colleges of pharmacy nationwide as part of "Team Up, Pressure Down," a component of the Million Hearts effort, which was launched by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

In a letter to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a Million Hearts partner, the NACDS Foundation highlighted the screenings and counseling provided to thousands of patients during the health fairs, which were located in community pharmacies, senior centers and other community venues.

The outreach at the events corresponded directly with Million Hearts' efforts to prevent heart attacks and strokes via greater awareness of the "ABCS" of heart health: Appropriate aspirin therapy, Blood pressure control, Cholesterol management and Smoking cessation.

Specifically, pharmacists and pharmacy students provided aspirin education for 1,923 patients; blood pressure screening and education for 2,909 patients; cholesterol screening and education for 1,750 patients; and smoking cessation education for 1,292 patients.

In addition, pharmacists and Rx students also referred patients back to their primary care doctors when necessary. Results of the checkups showed that a number of patients needed a referral from their physicians for more treatment. For instance, of those screened for blood pressure, 24% were referred for follow-up with their doctor, and of those screened for cholesterol, 36% were referred to their physicians.

"We're excited to share the success of the foundation's community health fairs with you, and we want to continue to affirm our commitment as an active partner of Million Hearts. We hope that these results along with those of other Million Hearts partners can be used as a sign of success of this great initiative," wrote Steve Anderson, chairman of the NACDS Foundation and chief executive of NACDS, and Kathleen Jaeger, president of the NACDS Foundation.

"We applaud the NACDS Foundation for making blood pressure control a priority for pharmacy students," stated Janet Wright, executive director of the Million Hearts initiative. "Research shows that pharmacists play a critical role in helping individuals get their blood pressure under control, which in turn reduces the risk for heart attacks and strokes."

Participating schools and colleges of pharmacy sponsored by the NACDS Foundation included Chicago State University, Duquesne University, Harding University, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Boston, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Worcester, Roosevelt University, Texas A&M, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Minnesota, University of Mississippi, University of New Mexico, University of North Carolina, University of Oklahoma, University of South Florida and Western New England University.

Advertisement