Tony Clement, president of Canada's Treasury Board, has announced proposed changes to the Food and Drug Regulations that are expected to cut red tape for Canadian pharmacies.


Tony Clement, Treasury Board, Canada, Food and Drug Regulations, Canadian pharmacies, pharmacy technicians, pharmacists, community pharmacists, Ontarion Pharmacists' Association, Dennis Darby


































































































































































































































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Canada proposes regulatory change for pharmacy techs

January 21st, 2013

TORONTO – Tony Clement, president of Canada's Treasury Board, has announced proposed changes to the Food and Drug Regulations that are expected to cut red tape for Canadian pharmacies.

On Monday, Clement unveiled a change that will allow provincially regulated pharmacy technicians to transfer prescriptions from one pharmacy to another, a task now limited to pharmacists. Pharmacy techs also will be allowed to complete the associated paperwork.

The move stands to save pharmacies an estimated $8.7 million per year in administrative costs. About 15,000 community pharmacists across Canada could benefit immediately from the amendment, which is slated to take effect in three provinces this year: Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.

"Cutting red tape and freeing businesses from unnecessary regulations so they can focus on creating jobs, innovating and growing is a key priority of our government," commented Clement, who also is minister for the Federal Economic Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor). "This change will enable pharmacists to spend more time providing advice to and serving customers, while running their businesses."

The proposal was applauded by the Ontarion Pharmacists' Association.

"This amendment to the Food and Drug Regulations is a welcome step forward, and one that will enable pharmacists to focus more of their time on direct patient care," Dennis Darby, chief executive officer of the association, said in a statement. "As key members of the pharmacy team, pharmacy technicians need to be able to practice to their full scope so that pharmacists can provide the best, most efficient health care to patients."

The changes are part of Canada's Red Tape Reduction Action Plan. Launched in October, the initiative aims to introduce systemic reforms to the federal system to limit "regulatory creep" and make the system more transparent, accountable and predictable. The effort includes 90 department-specific changes to eliminate unnecessary paperwork and introduce time-saving measures.

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