The Cardinal Health Foundation and the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy have introduced the Medication Safety tool kit, designed to teach children about the dangers of medicine poisoning.


Cardinal Health Foundation, Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Medication Safety tool kit, medicine poisoning, Generation Rx, educational resources, medication abuse and misuse, National Poison Prevention Week, Safe Kids Worldwide, Betsy Walker, Molly Downing










































































































































































































































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Cardinal tool kit teaches kids about medicine safety

March 13th, 2014

DUBLIN, Ohio – The Cardinal Health Foundation and the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy have introduced the Medication Safety tool kit, designed to teach children about the dangers of medicine poisoning.

Cardinal Health said Thursday that the tool kit, the fifth in its Generation Rx series of educational resources on medication abuse and misuse, comes in time for National Poison Prevention Week, which runs March 16 to 22.

Created by Ohio State University College of Pharmacy faculty, staff and students in tandem with local elementary schools. Medication Safety tool kit gives parents, teachers, organizational leaders and health professionals aresources to discuss the issue of medication safety with elementary-aged children. It includes materials appropriate for elementary-aged children grades K to 5.

The materials focus on four medication safety principles: Only take medicine given by a trusted adult; do not share medication or take someone else's medication; keep medications in their original containers to avoid confusion with candy or other medicines; and always store medicine in a safe place, such as a locked cabinet or a high shelf that children cannot reach.

Ranging from activity stations and supplemental worksheets to games and visual aids, the kit's contents enable customization based on the audience and venue to help foster conversation and educate kids on how to use medicines safely, according to Cardinal.

"Our newest tool kit allows adults to start the conversation of medication safety at a very early age," Betsy Walker, manager of community relations at Cardinal Health, said in a statement. "This collection of age-appropriate resources provides a foundation for educating our youth about how to use medicines safely before entering their formative years, where prescription drug abuse starts becoming a prevalent issue."

According to a study by Safe Kids Worldwide, more than 67,000 children were treated in emergency departments for medicine poisoning in 2011. The increased accessibility of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, along with children's curiosity, makes it important to educate today's youth in medication safety at an early age, Cardinal and the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy noted.

"We are excited to provide our communities with this versatile collection of engaging activities that help educate today's youth about how to safely use and store medicine," stated Molly Downing, Ph.D., fellow, pharmacology education and outreach at the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy. "Whether you are a parent, teacher, organizational leader or health professional, this tool kit equips adults with the necessary resources to discuss this important issue with children before they enter their teen and adult years."

The Generation Rx website also offers four other tool kits — aimed at teens, college students, adults and seniors — to prevent medication misuse and abuse.

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