Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc. has rolled out Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) delayed-release capsules, for the treatment of heartburn and related ailments, to pharmacies in the United States.


Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Dexilant, Kapidex, dexlansoprazole, heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERD, pharmaceutical, Tim Rudolphi














































































































































































































































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Takeda ships Dexilant antacid

April 26th, 2010

DEERFIELD, Ill. – Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc. has rolled out Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) delayed-release capsules, for the treatment of heartburn and related ailments, to pharmacies in the United States.

Dexilant is available in 30 mg and 60 mg capsules, Takeda said Monday. The product is a once-daily, oral medication indicated for the treatment of heartburn associated with symptomatic non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the healing of erosive esophagitis and the maintenance of healed erosive esophagitis.

A proton pump inhibitor, Dexilant has a dual delayed-release formulation designed to provide two separate releases of medication, the company said.

Takeda had recently announced that the product trade name for dexlansoprazole in the United States would be changed from Kapidex to Dexilant. The formulation, indication and approved dosages of Dexilant remain the same as that of Kapidex, which was originally approved by the Food and Drug Administration in January 2009, according to the company.

After receiving reports of dispensing errors with Kapidex, Takeda, in coordination with the FDA, determined that in the interest of patient safety a name change would be the best way to minimize future errors.

"Takeda's response to this situation further demonstrates our commitment to patient safety. We are working to ensure a seamless transition from Kapidex to Dexilant to mitigate any disruption to patient care," Tim Rudolphi, vice president of marketing at Takeda, said in a statement. "Over the past several months, we conducted a comprehensive communication plan to educate pharmacists, reaching out to more than 45,000 pharmacies and other health care professionals, including all major prescription insurers and drug wholesalers, about the name change. Today, we will begin expanding these efforts to also reach consumers."

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