Procter & Gamble Co. said the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Health Canada have found no cause linking its Pampers Dry Max diapers with public reports of diaper rash and other skin conditions.


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CPSC: Pampers Dry Max not linked to diaper rash

September 3rd, 2010

CINCINNATI – Procter & Gamble Co. said the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Health Canada have found no cause linking its Pampers Dry Max diapers with public reports of diaper rash and other skin conditions.

According to P&G, the CPSC and Health Canada findings came after a comprehensive review. The company said it welcomed the review and cooperated fully with both agencies.

"We are thankful that the U.S. CPSC and Health Canada conducted their thorough reviews and have not identified any cause for concern with Pampers with Dry Max," Jodi Allen, vice president of Pampers, said in a statement. "Our heartfelt mission is always to care for and protect babies. And as such, safety is — and will always be — our No. 1 priority.

"We hope that today's announcement will reassure the millions of moms and dads and child caregivers who place their trust in Pampers and Dry Max every day," Allen added. "We thank our customers for their continued support and greatly value and appreciate the trust they place in us."

The CPSC had said in May that it began an investigation of the Dry Max diapers after some parents had complained that the product appeared to be the cause of rashes and chemical burns on their children.

In a statement Thursday, the agency said, "The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada have reviewed consumer incident reports and other information involving Pampers Dry Max diapers. To date, the review has not identified any specific cause linking Dry Max diapers to diaper rash."

The CPSC reported that from April through August 2010, it received nearly 4,700 incident reports about diaper rash, noting that about 85% of the complaints came in May and then dropped off significantly.

P&G said Thursday that to help parents deal with diaper rash, which it reported affects 2.5 million babies on average at any given time, Pampers is sponsoring the distribution of educational materials produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) that provide detailed information on the care and treatment of infant skin conditions, including diaper rash. The materials are now available as free brochures and in the summer issue of AAP Healthy Children Magazine through many pediatricians' offices, online at www.healthychildren.org and at pampers.com.

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