Nice-Pak Products Inc. has transformed its Mooresville, Ind., manufacturing plant into what it calls a “zero landfill” facility.


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Sustainability strategy progresses at Nice-Pak

December 28th, 2010

MOORESVILLE, Ind. – Nice-Pak Products Inc. has transformed its Mooresville, Ind., manufacturing plant into what it calls a “zero landfill” facility.

The move, expected to keep more than 4,200 tons of waste a year from going into landfills, is the second transformation of a Nice-Pak facility in the past six months.

In July the company announced that its Green Bay, Wis., plant had begun converting waste into biomass pellets that are used as fuel for producing ­electricity. In addition, Nice-Pak said its Orangeburg, N.Y., plant is close to becoming landfill-free.

“Our products touch consumers more than 100 billion times a year,” chairman and chief executive officer Robert Julius said. “We have an opportunity to make a significant difference through environmentally responsible actions, including helping educate families and communities about the important role they have in protecting our environment.”

To eliminate the waste coming out of its Mooresville facility, Nice-Pak has joined forces with a local firm that operates a waste-to-energy plant that turns refuse into energy that is used to produce steam heat for the city of Indianapolis.

The facility can process more than 2,000 tons of solid waste a day and can produce at least 4,500 pounds of steam per ton of waste. The steam is used to power the Indianapolis downtown heating loop, which includes businesses, Indiana University and Purdue University’s Indianapolis campus. To protect the environment, the waste-to-energy facility uses air pollution control equipment and continuously monitors emissions.

Nice-Pak, a founding member of the Sustainability Consortium, said the conversion of its manufacturing plants is part of its broader sustainability goals that aim to halve the amount of solid waste going into landfills over the next three years.

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