AstraZeneca provided more than $900 million in savings last year to over 545,000 U.S. patients in its AZ&Me prescription savings initiative.


AstraZeneca, AZ&Me, prescription savings, prescription savings program, Rich Fante, AstraZeneca U.S.








































































































































































































































INSIDE THIS ISSUE
News
Opinion
Other Services
Reprints / E-Prints
Submit News
White Papers

Supplier News Breaks Archives

AstraZeneca tallies savings in prescription program

January 31st, 2011

WILMINGTON, Del. – AstraZeneca provided more than $900 million in savings last year to over 545,000 U.S. patients in its AZ&Me prescription savings initiative.

The pharmaceutical company said Monday that AZ&Me programs, which provide medicines at no cost to eligible participants, saved patients $947 million in 2010, an 18% increase over the savings in 2009 and a 35% gain versus 2008.

Since the economic downturn took hold in 2008, AZ&Me prescription savings programs have saved patients a total of $2.3 billion on 10.6 million prescriptions, according to the drug maker.

Participation in the AZ&Me also has steadily risen over the past three years, AstraZeneca noted. In 2010, 545,927 patients participated in AZ&Me, up 7% from 2009 and 19% from 2008. Also last year, patients participating in AZ&Me filled 4.1 million prescriptions, a 7% increase over 2009 and a gain of 34% since 2008.

"While the economy appears to be getting stronger, we are still seeing record numbers of patients in our prescription savings programs, and they are staying in the programs longer," stated Rich Fante, president of AstraZeneca U.S. and regional vice president of North America at the company.

Through AZ&Me programs, AstraZeneca provides free medicines to qualifying individuals without prescription drug coverage who make up to $30,000 per year and families of four with $60,000 annual household income. Also eligible are Medicare Part D patients who make up to $30,000 per year or couples who make up to $40,000 per year, and Medicare Part D beneficiaries can have their filled prescription mailed to their home or doctor's office, AstraZeneca said.

In addition, AstraZeneca provides free medications to qualifying nonprofit organizations, such as disproportionate share hospitals, community health centers and community free clinics. This AZ&Me program connects patients to the medicines they need at the same time and place in which they receive their treatment, the company said.

Advertisement