Eli Lilly and Co. has rolled out Axiron testosterone topical solution to pharmacies nationwide.


Eli Lilly and Co., Axiron, testosterone topical solution, testosterone replacement therapy, testosterone levels, prescription medicine, Testosterone deficiency, David Ricks, Ronald Swerdloff, topical testosterone treatment






































































































































































































































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Lilly ships Axiron topical testosterone

April 4th, 2011

INDIANAPOLIS – Eli Lilly and Co. has rolled out Axiron testosterone topical solution to pharmacies nationwide.

The pharmaceutical company said late Friday that the Food and Drug Administration approved Axiron in November, making it the first and only testosterone replacement therapy applied to the underarm. Other forms of testosterone replacement therapies, the company said, include buccal tablets, subcutaneous pellets, transdermal patches, injections and topical gels.

"Lilly has built a strong reputation in men's health by providing innovative treatment options to patients and physicians," David Ricks, president of Lilly USA, said in a statement. "The addition of Axiron to our product portfolio allows us to build on that momentum and provide an innovative solution to patients who have a testosterone deficiency."

Axiron is used to treat men age 18 and older that have low or no testosterone. The prescription medicine has been shown to restore testosterone levels to within the normal range in most men, according to Lilly.

"Currently, health care professionals and patients have access to topical testosterone treatment options that are applied to various areas of the skin. Axiron offers a new application method for patients to apply testosterone to the underarm using an applicator," stated Dr. Ronald Swerdloff, clinical trial investigator for the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and professor of medicine at the University of California in Los Angeles. "It is important to have different options available for treating low testosterone to help a patient select an option that's best for him."

Testosterone deficiency is a clinical condition in which the testicles, hypothalamus or pituitary gland is affected by disease or damage that results in inhibiting hormone secretion and testosterone production.

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