Mylan Inc. has announced the rollout of two new generic drugs, including medications for high blood pressure and epilepsy.


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Mylan ships pair of new generics

December 27th, 2011

PITTSBURGH – Mylan Inc. has announced the rollout of two new generic drugs, including medications for high blood pressure and epilepsy.

The company said Tuesday that its subsidiary Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. has begun shipping eprosartan mesylate tablets in strengths of 400 mg (base) and 600 mg (base), a generic version of Abbott Laboratories' Teveten tablets for hypertension.

Mylan reported that it was the first company to have filed a substantially complete abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) containing a Paragraph IV certification to the Food and Drug Administration for eprosartan mesylate tablets, 400 mg (base) and 600 mg (base), and was awarded 180 days of marketing exclusivity.

Eprosartan mesylate tablets, 400 mg (base) and 600 mg (base), had U.S. sales of about $4.9 million for the 12 months ended Sept. 30, according to IMS Health data cited by Mylan.

In addition, Mylan Pharmaceuticals is launching levetiracetam extended-release tablets in 500-mg and 750-mg dosages.

According to Mylan, the product is the generic version of UCB's Keppra XR tablets, a treatment for partial onset seizures in patients over 16 years of age with epilepsy.

Levetiracetam ER tablets had U.S. sales of about $162.8 million for the 12 months ended Sept. 30, 2011, based on IMS Health figures.

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