Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration to market QNASL Nasal Aerosol, a "dry" nasal aerosol corticosteroid that treats seasonal and year-round nasal allergy symptoms.


Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, QNASL, Nasal Aerosol, dry nasal aerosol, nasal aerosol corticosteroid, nasal allergy symptoms, allergic rhinitis, Tushar Shah, Teva Global Respiratory Research and Development, Gary Gross, Dallas Asthma and Allergy Center, Mike Tringale, Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, nasal spray, allergy nasal spray












































































































































































































































INSIDE THIS ISSUE
News
Opinion
Other Services
Reprints / E-Prints
Submit News
White Papers

Supplier News Breaks Archives

Teva set to ship 'dry' allergy nasal spray

March 26th, 2012

JERUSALEM – Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration to market QNASL Nasal Aerosol, a "dry" nasal aerosol corticosteroid that treats seasonal and year-round nasal allergy symptoms.

Teva said Monday that the product, for adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older, is slated to ship to pharmacies in April will be the first marketed nonaqueous or dry nasal aerosol in a product category that reports annual sales of $2.5 billion.

"The approval of QNASL is a significant milestone for Teva Respiratory and represents our commitment to addressing the unmet needs of millions of Americans suffering from allergic rhinitis," stated Tushar Shah, senior vice president at Teva Global Respiratory Research and Development. "We are committed to the development of new options for treatment of respiratory diseases that meet patients' needs."

QNASL is delivered as a once-daily, pressurized and nonaqueous aerosol propelled by hydrofluoroalkane (HFA), which is environmentally friendly, and offers a built-in dose counter, according to Teva.

"There are some patients with allergic rhinitis who report dissatisfaction with the currently available therapies," Gary Gross, practicing allergist and co-founder of the Dallas Asthma and Allergy Center, said in a statement. "The approval of QNASL offers these patients a safe and effective treatment option with a new dry mode of delivery."

Mike Tringale, vice president of external affairs at the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, commented, "Given the number of people living with allergic rhinitis who are still seeking adequate relief, the availability of a new dry nasal aerosol is very welcome news. Seasonal and perennial allergies can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, and we commend Teva for providing patients with a great new option that expands access to quality care."

Advertisement