One Call Alert has landed retail distribution for its medical alarm system at a number of pharmacy chains.


One Call Alert, medical alarm, Shopko, Brookshire Brothers, Associated Food Stores, medical alarm system, One Call Alert Emergency Monitoring Center, Linda Clark, pharmacy chains


































































































































































































































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Pharmacy chains to carry One Call Alert medical alarm

January 25th, 2013

HOUSTON – One Call Alert has landed retail distribution for its medical alarm system at a number of pharmacy chains.

One Call Alert said Friday that Shopko, Brookshire Brothers and Associated Food Stores are slated to begin selling the One Call Alert medical alarm through a new display in their pharmacies in February.

A lightweight, waterproof pendant, the One Call Alert system requires just a push of a button to trigger an alarm call to the One Call Alert Emergency Monitoring Center. There, a highly trained operator speaks directly to the person and calls a neighbor, family member or friend to respond. In a medical emergency, the operator can summon an ambulance and provide paramedics with necessary information.

"One Call Alert is proud to offer our life-saving services to customers of these fine retailers. One Call Alert provides a safety net for many seniors who wish to remain at home, but it also provides peace of mind for their family and loved ones, too," stated Linda Clark, chief operating officer of One Call Alert.

One Call Alert reported that according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, falls are the chief cause of injuries to seniors, and about 2 million seniors will visit the emergency room this year because of a fall-related incident.

The company added that the One Call Alert system should be considered for people who have a history of falling, are over age 70, live alone or are left alone for extended periods by a caregiver, use mobility-assisted devices (such as walkers, canes, crutches or wheelchairs), have a history of medication management problems, have been hospitalized within the last 12 months, have sensory concerns (such as vision or hearing), or have cognitive concerns (such as dementia or Alzheimer's disease).

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