Sujanil Chemo Industries Co., a provider of household insecticides, is touting its Lice-Nil as a natural, herbal, oil-based preparation for eradicating lice and nits.


Lice-Nil, Sujanil Chemo Industries, lice treatments














































































































































































































































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Lice-Nil provides natural option for treating lice

April 28th, 2014

PUNE, India – Sujanil Chemo Industries Co., a provider of household insecticides, is touting its Lice-Nil as a natural, herbal, oil-based preparation for eradicating lice and nits.

“Lice-Nil has proven its mettle as a treatment that guarantees results,” the company says. “The main reason is that Lice-Nil is oil based; it does not evaporate or get washed away like other products, which are shampoo-based lotions or rinses.”

The oil base, says Sujanil, allows the product to evenly spread through the hair, covering the lice as they stick to the hair, penetrating their shells and destroying the nits. “[Lice-Nil] puts an end to lice and nits in just 10 to 15 minutes.”

Other best-selling lice treatments can destroy live lice, but not always. Consequently, Sujanil notes, insecticide-resistant lice have evolved, making the once-rare head lice infestation a more common experience.

Because it is based on natural herbs that humans have safely used for centuries, Lice-Nil can be applied without worries about hair damage associated with some alcohol- or chemical-based lice treatments, the company says, adding that Lice-Nil’s herbal ingredients enhance hair texture.

Lice-Nil comes with a lice-removal comb with a magnifier that makes it easier to spot and remove lice.

Each year, there are 6 million to 12 million lice cases among U.S. children ages 3 to 11, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infestations occur year-round, though the number of cases seems to peak when children go back to school in the fall and again in January, possibly due to familial mingling during the holidays.

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