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FDA approves first nasal spray for epilepsy treatment

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SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Neurelis announced Monday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Valtoco (diazepam nasal spray) as an acute treatment of intermittent, stereotypic episodes of frequent seizure activity (ie, seizure clusters, acute repetitive seizures) that are distinct from a patient’s usual seizure pattern in people with epilepsy 6 years of age and older. The unique formulation of Valtoco incorporates Intravail for consistent and reliable absorption.

“Cluster or acute repetitive seizures are challenging to treat and highly disruptive in the lives of people with epilepsy,” said Neurelis president and CEO Craig Chambliss. “Valtoco was developed to provide an effective combination of reliability, safety and tolerability in a ready-to-use nasal spray. This is a defining moment for Neurelis as Valtoco is our first FDA-approved product. We are excited that we can now offer this treatment option to patients and provide additional support to the epilepsy community.”

Chambliss added that Valtoco was also granted seven years of Orphan Drug Exclusivity by the FDA Office of Orphan Products Development.

Valtoco is a proprietary formulation of diazepam incorporating the Science of Intravail. Intravail transmucosal absorption enhancement technology enables the non-invasive delivery of a broad range of protein, peptide and small molecule drugs. In the United States, there are over 3.4 million people with epilepsy, with approximately 200,000 new patients diagnosed each year. Despite the availability of chronic, daily oral medications to control epilepsy, a significant number of these patients continue to experience seizures. Of these uncontrolled patients, as many as 170,000 are at risk for episodes of frequent seizure activity, also known as cluster or acute repetitive seizures, representing a significant unmet need in the epilepsy community.

“This is an important development in the epilepsy community,” said Dr. R. Edward Hogan, director of the Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Epilepsy Center in St. Louis. “Most seizures that require intervention are treated in an inconvenient manner. To be able to reliably treat seizure activity when and where it happens with a caregiver-administered option like Valtoco is a significant step forward. The availability of Valtoco may positively impact the lives of thousands of people with epilepsy who experience cluster or acute repetitive seizures and their care partners.”


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