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CRN demonstrates commitment to advance nutrition education

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WASHINGTON — The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the leading trade association for the dietary supplement and functional food industry, today announced that three students from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University were given educational awards to attend The Workshop: CRN’s Day of Science, held earlier this month in Carlsbad, California. As part of the award, the recipients, Carley Bowering, Kate Harrington and Emily Kjell, received funding for travel expenses and a waived registration fee for the scientific symposium, which featured experts in nutrition and dietary supplement research, specifically focused this year on the topics of “Healthy Aging” and “Development of Nutrition Research.” The recipients were selected based on their academic record and their commitment to research.

“CRN is a strong advocate for advancing education in nutrition science and we welcome opportunities to support students seeking further education and careers in nutrition science and policy,” said Andrea Wong, senior vice president, scientific & regulatory affairs. “As a growing number of Americans are looking to registered dietitians or nutritionists as reliable sources of information on dietary supplements, it is important to CRN that we increase access to reputable, educational resources for the future of nutrition health care practitioners.”

The educational awards are part of CRN’s most recent efforts to support the nutrition research community. CRN has provided educational awards for Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy students to attend The Workshop since 2016. Additionally, since 2008, CRN has provided the American Society of Nutrition (ASN) with annual education awards for nutrition researchers through the Mary Swartz Rose Awards, which are presented to a senior and a junior investigator in the field of essential nutrients and bioactive food components.

Americans continue to demonstrate a growing interest in dietary supplements and a proactive stance toward their own self-care; supplementation remains a common component to many of their health regimens. With seventy-seven percent of Americans taking dietary supplements, CRN recognizes how critically important it is to have continued research on these products and their ingredients and will continue be an advocate on behalf of nutrition science education.


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